Anthology of classical myth : primary sources in translation by Stephen M. Trzaskoma, R. Scott Smith, Stephen Brunet

By Stephen M. Trzaskoma, R. Scott Smith, Stephen Brunet

This quantity is designed as a significant other to the traditional undergraduate mythology textbooks or, while assigned along the critical Greek and Roman works, as a source-based replacement to these textbooks.

In addition to the total texts of the Homeric Hymns and Hesiod's Theogony, this assortment offers beneficiant decisions from over 50 texts composed among the Archaic Age and the fourth century A.D. historic interpretation of fable is represented the following in choices from the allegorists Heraclitus, Cornutus and Fulgentius, the rationalists Palaephatus and Diodorus of Sicily, and the philosophers and historians Plato, Herodotus and Thucydides. Appendices deal with facts from inscriptions, papyri and Linear B drugs and comprise a thematic index, a mythological dictionary, and genealogies. A considerate creation helps scholars operating with the first resources and the opposite assets provided the following; an intensive notice to teachers deals feedback on the way to include this booklet into their courses.

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The prime example are the Amazons, whose assumption of the roles of warrior and leader was considered such an aberration by Diodorus Siculus and Palaephatus that they tried to explain the Amazons away as either having lived long in the past or never at all. Apollodorus is more accepting of the existence of Amazons in his account of Heracles and Hippolyte, while a close parallel for the Amazons can be found in the story of the Thracian Harpalyce (Hyginus 193). Procris and Leucippe are two examples of women who do not so much take on men’s roles but simply pretend to be men, with the implication that they could not live their lives as freely as they wanted as women (Antoninus Liberalis 41; Hyginus 189, 190).

Procris and Leucippe are two examples of women who do not so much take on men’s roles but simply pretend to be men, with the implication that they could not live their lives as freely as they wanted as women (Antoninus Liberalis 41; Hyginus 189, 190). The most obvious case of a man who breaks gender barriers by dressing and living as a woman is Statius’ account of Achilles in drag. Negative views of women are also represented here. Attacks on the female gender in Greek literature date back to Hesiod’s two versions of the Pandora story, both of which are included in this volume, as is Semonides’ poem on the different types of women.

G) Lucretius ca. 94–ca. __________? ________? __________? ______? __________? AD 100 150 300 250 200 100 Roman Period (1st c. BC–5th c. __________? _______________________? ___________________? ____________? ____________________________ 250 Bion fl. 100 Eratosthenes 3rd c. Theocritus ca. 300–ca. 260 Callimachus ca. 305–ca. 240 Cleanthes 331–232 Palaephatus 4th or 3rd c. Theophrastus ca. 371–ca. ___________________________? ____________? _________ 100 1 We have included Latin authors under Roman period although the Roman period traditionally begins in 31 BC.

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